“Being Irish, he had an abiding sense of tragedy, which sustained him through temporary periods of joy.” ― W.B. Yeats
"In the bleak midwinter Frosty wind made moan, Earth stood had as iron, Water like a stone, Snow had fallen, snow on snow, Snow on snow, In the bleak midwinter, Long ago." -  Christina Rossetti
The Brothers Grimm didn’t really intend to write sweet stories for children, they were linguists and wanted to write about and share their German culture……. Once upon a time dates back to Chaucer……… The French writer Marie Catherine d’ Aulnoy coined the phrase Fairy Tale in her Les Contes des Fées “The French fairy tale writers were so popular and prolific that when their stories were eventually collected in the 18th century, they filled forty–one volumes of a massive publication called the Cabinet des Fées. Charles Perrault is the French fairy tale writer whom history has singled out for attention, but the majority of tales in the Cabinet des Fées were penned by women writers who ran and attended the leading salons: Marie–Catherine d’Aulnoy, Henriette Julie de Murat, Marie–Jeanne L'Héritier, and numerous others. These were educated women with an unusual degree of social and artistic independence, and within their use of the fairy tale form one can find distinctly subversive, even feminist subtext.” ― Terri Windling, Black Swan, White Raven “In older myths, the dark road leads downward into the Underworld, where Persephone is carried off by Hades, much against her will, while Ishtar descends of her own accord to beat at the gates of Hell. This road of darkness lies to the West, according to Native American myth, and each of us must travel it at some point in our lives. The western road is one of trials, ordeals, disasters and abrupt life changes — yet a road to be honored, nevertheless, as the road on which wisdom is gained. James Hillman, whose theory of 'archetypal psychology' draws extensively on Greco–Roman myth, echoes this belief when he argues that darkness is vital at certain periods of life, questioning our modern tendency to equate mental health with happiness. It is in the Underworld, he reminds us, that seeds germinate and prepare for spring. Myths of descent and rebirth connect the soul's cycles to those of nature.” ― Terri Windling
February 26th is Fairy Tale Day……. Fairy tales are really stories about cultures in different places and times….and the original versions are much more gruesome than the versions that have been toned down……The original versions are well worth reading and offer much insight to the mindset of the people at the time.
mélange
copyright 2013 - 2018 TGG
Literati
“In prehistoric times, early man was bowled over by natural events: rain, thunder, lightning, the violent shaking and moving of the ground, mountains spewing deathly hot lava, the glow of the moon, the burning heat of the sun, the twinkling of the stars. Our human brain searched for an answer, and the conclusion was that it all must be caused by something greater than ourselves - this, of course, sprouted the earliest seeds of religion. This theory is certainly reflected in faery lore. In the beautiful sloping hills of Connemara in Ireland, for example, faeries were believed to have been just as beautiful, peaceful, and pleasant as the world around them. But in the Scottish Highlands, with their dark, brooding mountains and eerie highland lakes, villagers warned of deadly water-kelpies and spirit characters that packed a bit more punch.” ― Signe Pike, Faery Tale: One Woman's Search for Enchantment in a Modern World
“She had always wanted words, she loved them; grew up on them. Words gave her clarity, brought reason, shape.” - Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient
"Storytellers ought not to be too tame. They ought to be wild creatures who function adequately in society. They are best in disguise. If they lose all their wildness, they cannot give us the truest joys." - Ben Okri